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Simulations of fishing effects on the southern Benguela fish community using an individual-based model: learning from a comparison with {ECOSIM}

TitleSimulations of fishing effects on the southern Benguela fish community using an individual-based model: learning from a comparison with {ECOSIM}
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2004
AuthorsShin, Y-J, Shannon, LJ, Cury, PM
JournalAfrican Journal of Marine Science
Volume26
Pagination95–114
ISSN1814-232X
Abstract

By applying an individual-based model ({OSMOSE}) to the southern Benguela ecosystem, a multispecies analysis is proposed, complementary to that provided by the application of {ECOPATH}/{ECOSIM} models. To reconstruct marine foodwebs, {OSMOSE} is based on the hypothesis that predation is a size-structured process. In all, 12 fish species, chosen for their importance in terms of biomass and catches, are explicitly modelled. Growth, reproduction and mortality parameters are required to model their dynamics and trophic interactions. Maps of mean spatial distribution of the species are compiled from published literature. Taking into account the spatial component is necessary because spatial co-occurrence determines potential interactions between predatory fish and prey fish of suitable size. To explore ecosystem effects of fishing, different fishing scenarios, previously examined using {ECOSIM}, are simulated using the {OSMOSE} model. They explore the effects of targeting fish species in the southern Benguela considered to be predators (Cape hake Merluccius capensis and M. paradoxus) or prey (anchovy Engraulis encrasicolus, sardine Sardinops sagax, round herring Etrumeus whiteheadi). Simulation results are compared and are generally consistent with those obtained using an {ECOSIM} model. This cross-validation appears to be a promising means of evaluating the robustness of model outputs, when separate validation of marine ecosystem models are still difficult to perform.

URLhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.2989/18142320409504052
DOI10.2989/18142320409504052